Bateman’s

BY CHARLES EVANS ‘That’s She! The Only She! Make an honest woman of her – quick!’ was how Rudyard Kipling and his wife, Carrie, felt the first time they saw Bateman’s. Surrounded by the wooded landscape of the Sussex Weald, this 17th-century house, with its mullioned windows and oak beams, provided a much needed sanctuary to this world-famous writer. The rooms, described by him as … Continue reading Bateman’s

Hinchingbrooke

BY CHARLES EVANS Hinchingbrooke House in Huntingdon, Cambridgeshire, was built around an 11th-century nunnery. After the Reformation, it passed into the hands of the Cromwell family, and subsequently, became the home of the Earls of Sandwich, including John Montagu, 4th Earl of Sandwich, reputedly the “inventor” of the modern sandwich. On 8 March 1538, Richard Williams (alias Cromwell) had the grant of the nunnery of … Continue reading Hinchingbrooke

Syon

BY CHARLES EVANS Syon House, and its 200-acre park, Syon Park, is in west London, historically within the parish of Isleworth, in the county of Middlesex. It belongs to the Duke of Northumberland and is now his family’s London residence. After the dissolution of the convent on the site, Syon was occupied by Protector Somerset and John Dudley, Duke of Percy, 9th Earl of Northumberland, … Continue reading Syon

Charlton House

BY CHARLES EVANS Among several English houses with the name Charlton House, the most prominent is a Jacobean building in Charlton, London. It is regarded as the best-preserved ambitious Jacobean house in Greater London. It was built in 1607–12 of red brick with stone dressing, and has an “E”-plan layout. The interior features a great hall, chapel, state dining room, saloon and gallery. The house … Continue reading Charlton House

Lacock Abbey

BY CHARLES EVANS Sir William Sharington, a man of the Tudor renaissance, preserved the entire cloister (13th and 15th centuries) of the nunnery at Lacock Abbey in Wiltshire which, c. 1550, he converted into a highly picturesque dwelling. Sharington, servant of Protector Somerset, was a pioneer, with Sir John Thynne of Longleat in the new Italian architecture, and his work here comprises some of its … Continue reading Lacock Abbey

Plas Newydd, Anglesea

BY CHARLES EVANS Henry William Paget, Earl of Uxbridge, who commanded the Allied Cavalry and lost a leg at Waterloo, was, in recognition, created Marquess of Anglesea and remembered by his family as Uncle One-Leg. About 1810 he had engaged James Wyatt to remodel Plas Newydd, which stands on the Southern shore of the island near the end of the Victoria Bridge and looking across … Continue reading Plas Newydd, Anglesea