Has Woke Won?

BY JAMES BEMBRIDGE Titling her book on the assumption that it has, Joanna Williams delivers a powerful critique against this cultural cancer which has now metastasised itself into every aspect of our lives. It may seem absurd to afford a tabloid buzzword like Woke with any degree of intellectual seriousness, but Williams’ arguments – peppered with persuasive evidence and delivered in a scholarly and detached … Continue reading Has Woke Won?

Andromono: The Gary McGhee Interview

The Squires interview one of our popular guest writers and contributors, author Gary C. McGhee, about his debut Sci-Fi novel ANDROMONO. What’s your background as a writer? I have had short stories published and won a literary Prize. I also wrote a novel which was well-received, but I decided to learn how to write screenplays for TV and Film as my natural writing style is … Continue reading Andromono: The Gary McGhee Interview

Farm to Fork

BY NICK PEARCE Providing a seasonal tour of a traditional farming year, passionate beef farmer Joe Stanley seeks to bridge this knowledge gap and inform the reader about the journey their food takes before it gets to the plate, revealing the realities of modern agricultural life for a British lowland farmer. Drawing on a lifetime of experience, he strips observations of the countryside and agricultural … Continue reading Farm to Fork

Family Are the Friends You Choose

BY NIGEL BEAN Marthe Kiley-Worthington is internationally renowned for her work on animal welfare, ecological agriculture and understanding animal minds. In particular, how to put well thought out theories into practice, allowing for the ecological controls and conflicting interests of all. Marthe was one of the first to encounter animal rights activists and their movement’s hostile nature in the 1980’s.  She was the first to … Continue reading Family Are the Friends You Choose

An Artist by Nature

BY NICK PEARCE Rodger McPhail is a world-famous British painter, best known for his detailed wildlife paintings of sporting fowl, fish, and dogs. After studying at both Liverpool and Coventry Art Colleges, he achieved the rare distinction of having a painting published on the front cover of The Shooting Times at the age of just 19. With numerous exhibitions at The Rountree Tryon Gallery and … Continue reading An Artist by Nature

Moorland Matters

BY DOMINIC WIGHTMAN Trying to brush up on eco matters in light of recent events, I took it upon myself to read Ian Coghill’s ‘Moorland Matters: The Battle for the Uplands against Authoritarian Conservation’ when the publisher, Quiller, sent through a review copy to the magazine. I chose well. This is a masterful book and it’s written in such a refreshing way. It offers such … Continue reading Moorland Matters

The Ideology of Failure

BY ANDREW MOODY When researching Stephen Pax Leonard, the author of the 2018 Conservative polemic The Ideology of Failure: How Europe Bought Into Ideas That Will Weaken and Divide It, I couldn’t find any reviews of the book. In my search however, I found articles from 2018 about Leonard’s unpaid Research position at Durham university being cancelled after he allegedly posted Antisemitic and Islamophobic tweets, … Continue reading The Ideology of Failure

The Executioner’s Song

BY ANDREW MOODY Gary Gilmore was once as famous as most movie stars or athletes. Parodies of him played on Saturday Night Live. Johnny Cash called him on Death Row. Gilmore had been released from prison after twelve and a half years, spent nine months of freedom falling back into petty crime, developed a relationship with a teenage divorcee, before randomly killing two men. He … Continue reading The Executioner’s Song

Drink!

BY JAMIE FOSTER A delightful book to dip in and out of, Bruce Anderson’s ‘Drink!’ is a collection of his columns from The Spectator. Published by Quiller, this slim volume is a series of vignettes full of joie de vivre. Each column recollects a different occasion on which Anderson is drinking wine and it is a joy to be transported by him to so many … Continue reading Drink!

The Single-Minded Country Boy

BY TOM GALLAGHER Antonio Salazar was Europe’s longest serving Prime Minister in modern times. I wonder how much this can be ascribed to his farming background? In his 36 years presiding over the affairs of Portugal, this conservative autocrat, never allowed himself to be swallowed up by the bustle and self-importance of its capital, Lisbon. He ran Portugal rather like a punctilious head butler in … Continue reading The Single-Minded Country Boy

Crowley Demystified

BY ANDREW MOODY Aleister Crowley, the Great Beast, dictated nearly forty years after preparatory school at the Plymouth Brethren: “I had been the butt of every bully in school. My whole life seemed at times to be one slimy subterfuge to cozen death.” While perusing the National Portrait Gallery some years back, I noted Crowley’s magical portrait (it did not represent his image but worked … Continue reading Crowley Demystified

The Moon is Down

BY ANDREW MOODY In 1940, one year after the publication of John Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath, the Nazis had overrun most of Europe. Steinbeck was a clear-eyed, moralistic and political realist who knew that US involvement in the war was an inevitability. He joined several government intelligence agencies voluntarily that were created between 1940 and 1942. Two of the organisations were forerunners for the … Continue reading The Moon is Down

On the Green Hill of Tara

Robert Adam’s new novel ‘On the Green Hill of Tara’ explores the beginning of Ireland’s formal relationship with the EEC. The backdrop to Ireland’s final accession application on 30 June 1970 was the second year of the Northern Ireland Troubles and in May of that year, the ‘Dublin Arms Crisis.’ This was the political scandal when members of Jack Lynch’s cabinet, no less, were caught … Continue reading On the Green Hill of Tara

To Silence a Mockingbird

BY MANDY BALDWIN I mean it when I say, if I were writing this in pen and ink, it would be blotched with my tears. Mississippi schools have taken Harper Lee’s masterwork, To Kill A Mockingbird, off the schools reading list, as some parents find it ‘disturbing’. What’s really ‘disturbing’ of course, are the implications of suppressing a masterpiece because it offends idiots. To Kill … Continue reading To Silence a Mockingbird

Monbiot’s Unintended Consequences

BY DAVID EYLES Don’t get me wrong about all this – I’m rather fond of George Monbiot’s writing. It is always entertaining and there is plenty to get your teeth into to get the argumentative juices flowing. His book – Feral – is just as you would expect. It is well written, almost poetic in places, spattered with knowledgeable asides about ecological systems and natural … Continue reading Monbiot’s Unintended Consequences

The True Believer

BY PATRICK MILLER For men to plunge headlong into an undertaking of vast change, they must be intensely discontented yet not destitute, and they must have the feeling that by the possession of some potent doctrine, infallible leader or some new technique they have access to a source of irresistible power. They must also have an extravagant conception of the prospects and potentialities of the … Continue reading The True Believer

Kipling’s Future is Secure

BY DOMINIC WIGHTMAN The future of education will hinge around pupils’ skills at source valuing and judgment. In a world where the best teachers will be available to pupils in hologram format, what other skills will pupils have to hone? Stimulated beyond our imaginations, their task will be to ride the knowledge stream and skilfully embrace the real while avoiding the fake; recognising that at times secondary … Continue reading Kipling’s Future is Secure