Brass Eye

BY ANDREW MOODY There’s an old saying that politicians and whores become respectable if enough time passes. The same could be said for iconoclastic comedian and Brass Eye creator Chris Morris, at one point the most hated man in Britain. Born in 1962 to parents who were both doctors, he read sciences at A Level and later zoology at Bristol University. He graduated with a … Continue reading Brass Eye

Chasing the Light

BY ANDREW MOODY Academy Award winning filmmaker and Vietnam veteran Oliver Stone has divided audiences for decades. His obsession with liberal politics and war guilt over America’s participation in what he claims are illegal wars make him one of the most contentious major filmmakers in Hollywood. His recent memoir Chasing the Light: How I Fought My Way into Hollywood is essential reading for fans of … Continue reading Chasing the Light

The Executioner’s Song

BY ANDREW MOODY Gary Gilmore was once as famous as most movie stars or athletes. Parodies of him played on Saturday Night Live. Johnny Cash called him on Death Row. Gilmore had been released from prison after twelve and a half years, spent nine months of freedom falling back into petty crime, developed a relationship with a teenage divorcee, before randomly killing two men. He … Continue reading The Executioner’s Song

Autobiography

BY ANDREW MOODY In my younger days, I was introduced to The Smiths, the eighties guitar band founded by Morrissey and Johnny Marr. I was immediately drawn to their melancholy music, it spoke of a world of loneliness and poverty, of sexual ambiguity, of criminality. Johnny Marr was clearly a guitar prodigy, and Morrissey’s defiant vocal and poetic lyrics touched me in a way that … Continue reading Autobiography

Knight of the Living Dead

BY ANDREW MOODY With Halloween fast approaching, amidst a global pandemic where world governments can shut down their respective populations inside their homes at a whim, you could do worse than revisiting George A Romero’s zombie trilogy for a night where the streets will be eerily empty of trick or treaters. Made on a shoestring budget back in 1968 by a group of enterprising advertising … Continue reading Knight of the Living Dead

Where Books Are Burnt

BY ANDREW MOODY Sir Ian Kershaw’s Hitler – a vast, two volume work – ranks amongst the very best studies of Nazism: “Hitler stood for at least some things they [German people] admired, and for many had become the symbol and embodiment of the national revival which the Third Reich had in many respects been perceived to accomplish.” It is split into two distinct halves: … Continue reading Where Books Are Burnt

Easy Rider Fifty Years On

BY ANDREW MOODY Released in 1969, the same year as the Apollo 11 moon landings, the Manson family murders, the inauguration of Richard Nixon, and the Altamont slayings, Easy Rider (prophetically for Hollywood and the wider world) opens with a cocaine deal. Cocaine had not yet taken over as the drug of choice for Hollywood stars and executives. This was one of many things that … Continue reading Easy Rider Fifty Years On

Cancer and Pisces

BY ANDREW MOODY Mick May, the author of Cancer and Pisces: One Man’s Story of his Unique Survival of Cancer, Interwoven with the Joy and Succour of Fishing was first diagnosed with Mesothelioma, a rare lung cancer caused by asbestos poisoning, back in 2013. (Mesothelioma) is a particularly vicious form of cancer. It is invariably fatal and the median life expectancy from diagnosis is around … Continue reading Cancer and Pisces

I’m Not With the Band

BY ANDREW MOODY Much like being in a fantastic new band, surely, having a favourite new band is one of life’s most intoxicating thrills, a prismatic explosion of hitherto dormant energy channelled from the atmosphere directly into your soul; an atomic collision promising unknowable new possibilities of sonic beguilement, lyrical connection, dancing upside down on a dance floor with your greatest friends and talking synapse … Continue reading I’m Not With the Band

Room 237

BY ANDREW MOODY Stanley Kubrick’s 1980 epic horror movie The Shining has terrified and puzzled audiences for four decades. Stephen King, who wrote the novel that Kubrick adapted, called the movie “maddening and perverse”, and like watching a brilliant ice skater doing nothing but endless figure eights. Steven Spielberg, a close friend of Kubrick’s, admitted he didn’t get it, that it was histrionic and too … Continue reading Room 237

Gallagher’s Salazar

BY JAMIE FOSTER An anomaly among modern dictators, Antonio de Oliveira Salazar exemplified the power of a negative personality. He held Portugal in thraldom for more than 40 years, a record of durability unmatched by Francisco Franco, Benito Mussolini or Adolf Hitler, his Fascist counterparts (and good friends). Due to Salazar’s long rule, a detached evaluation of him is difficult. He is considered either a … Continue reading Gallagher’s Salazar