Where Books Are Burnt

BY ANDREW MOODY Sir Ian Kershaw’s Hitler – a vast, two volume work – ranks amongst the very best studies of Nazism: “Hitler stood for at least some things they [German people] admired, and for many had become the symbol and embodiment of the national revival which the Third Reich had in many respects been perceived to accomplish.” It is split into two distinct halves: … Continue reading Where Books Are Burnt

Welsh Nationalism’s Shameful Antisemitism

BY MARCUS STEAD With each year that passes, the number of Holocaust survivors still living dwindles ever further. For many years after the liberation of the concentration camps, survivors often did not tell their stories, the full horror of what they had experienced being too painful to recount. But in recent decades, as they approached old age, survivors began to speak more openly about what … Continue reading Welsh Nationalism’s Shameful Antisemitism

Look Who’s Back

BY ANDREW MOODY Like Sleeping Beauty, Adolf Hitler wakes one morning in wasteland that used to house the Fuhrerbunker, smelling of petrol and with a splitting headache. He is impeccably dressed in his army uniform, and can’t quite understand why his final orders (total military harakiri) weren’t carried out. Soon he finds out it’s 2011 in Berlin, and, with the skill and courage only a … Continue reading Look Who’s Back

Satan’s Socialist Succubi

BY DOMINIC WIGHTMAN When Lucifer fell from Heaven, he took 2400 evil angels with him. When they arrived at Hell, there were eleven princes of Hell, commanding 6,660,000 demons each. Jesus so infuriated Lucifer. While the world was still a charnel house scarred by war and disease – Lucifer measuring his wicked conquests in blood and pain – Jesus’ insistence on secularism and his making … Continue reading Satan’s Socialist Succubi

May’s Vichy Britain?

BY DAVID EYLES Thursday 15th November 2018 might perhaps go down in British political history as one to remember. More likely is that it will be remembered as only one of a series of skirmishes by the Westminster political classes. But by the end of the day, two cabinet ministers had resigned, and four junior ministers had done likewise. Initially it was thought that 48 … Continue reading May’s Vichy Britain?